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uva7@yahoo.com

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someone refresh my memory. i remember alot , and i men alot of nights spent at the club on base . one side played country music, and i beleve at least a few  times i was their , the other played rock...   they sold beer and mixed drinks...    

a friend of mine is there now, and says its gone,  but there is a club on base but only sells beer one at a time, i remember buying pitchers...

so heres the question,

where was it, what was it called...  if i get more info i can send him to the location and do some looking around....     i thought you cold walk to it from pier 7 or 13 where we were tied up... 

maybe i was just alot more drunk than i thought..
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uva7@yahoo.com

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Years ago, junior sailors partied on Saturday nights at their local enlisted clubs.

Officers gathered at the officers' club on Sunday mornings for brunch with their families.

And the chiefs convened at their club on weeknights after work for drinks and discussion of Navy business.

But times have changed, and these clubs — once a pillar of Navy social life — are becoming relics. The Navy has an ever-shrinking number of them, and some that remain barely resemble the old-school drinking parlors from a generation ago.

"These operations have truly transformed into something much different from what you and I would picture as a traditional club," said Ed Cannon, the fleet readiness program director at Navy Installations Command.

The Navy has, technically, 74 clubs worldwide, but only three now operate as "clubs" in the true sense of charging membership dues. Many of the others have actually morphed into food court-style facilities with a Pizza Hut or a Subway attached. Others were renovated into bowling alleys or other "activity centers" — a combination known as "eatertainment," Cannon said.

The shift reflects dwindling popularity for the dining concept of sit-down meals with table service. Today's sailors, just like many civilians, prefer "fast-casual" restaurants like Chipotle or Panera, which require diners to order at a counter and carry their own food to a table, Cannon said.

One enlisted club in San Diego was recently converted from a traditional club with a sunken dance floor into a daytime-oriented space open to all ranks with a Starbucks coffee shop and a focus on services for single sailors, Cannon said.

Some former clubs are no longer rank-exclusive. For example, several bases are opening "brew pubs" or Irish-style pubs that focus on providing light snacks rather than formal dinners.

"These facilities … have learned to keep up with what the customer is looking for," he said.

What happened?

In 1955, when Bob Rasmussen arrived in San Diego as a newly winged aviator, he spent most evenings hanging out in the officers' club, which was a shabby building attached to his barracks. There wasn't much else to do — he shared a room with three other junior officers, and nobody ever watched television.

"There was an awful lot of unit cohesion that was generated at those gatherings," recalled Rasmussen, a retired captain and director of the Navy's National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Fla.

"The officer clubs used to be very much the center of social life," he said.

That's simply not the case anymore. One lieutenant assigned to Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., when asked about the officers' club at his base, had to think for several minutes about whether it even had one. It does, he said, but he and most other officers rarely go there except for the occasional command functions.

The reasons for the slow and steady demise are many.

Big Navy's crackdown on alcohol-related recreation is among the key factors. Heavy drinking at an on-base bar is likely to cause problems. Many sailors and officers are leery of drunken-driving checkpoints targeting those leaving on-base clubs.

Also, Navy clubs now must be financially self-sufficient, unlike those a generation ago. A rule in the 1990s forced clubs to function like real businesses, and many have been unable to compete with off-base options, which have expanded compared with those available a few decades ago.

Liberty centers For the younger sailors, the Navy is opening "liberty centers," on-base facilities with computers and televisions that are not included in the Navy's 74 clubs.

Across the Navy, these centers aim to provide sailors with an alcohol-free place to socialize. They offer computers for checking e-mail, video game consoles, televisions and maybe a pool table.

Jeremy Arnold, a 20-year-old fireman in the Navy Ceremonial Guard in Washington, dropped by his local liberty center at Naval Support Facility Anacostia on July 7 to watch some television and eat a sandwich.

He likes having a place to relax in the early evening before a night watch. But he laments not having an enlisted club like those he's heard older sailors talk about.

"I'd probably have been there just about every night. People will come here and talk, but most of the people are playing video games or watching a movie. It's not a social club."

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uva7@yahoo.com

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found my answer i think.... [frown]
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Keith Brownmiller

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There is a lot of truth about the demise of the "clubs". I remember as a Marine SNCO back in the 70s and 80s that we were expected to spend time at the club. When the services started to crack down on the use of alcohol back in the 80s, I saw the start of the demise of the clubs. They started by not requiring membership.

We still have "clubs" here in the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Ca but they are not structured in the ways of olk.

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AZ1 Leo Shults, AIMD 1983

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I remember the EM club at A School and the San Diego clubs, NAS Miramar, 32nd St. and North Island, as well as the clubs at NAS Whidbey Island (the Marine Club was my favorite) and Fallon (E6 and up).  I spent many nights drinking, dancing and even getting laid.

I also remember the clubs in Japan, they had slot machines.

When I was in ('75 - '83), it was a drinking mans Navy.  I knew a lot of guys who developed drinking issues as well as guys who learned their limits and respected them.

I got lucky and learned my limit early, but, that didn't keep me from pushing the limit.
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Rick Holly

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Reply with quote  #6 
When I went off ship, I very, very rarely drank. I simply cannot remember any enlisted club on 32nd St. Naval Base. My entertainment was playing Star Wars on a machine in a laundry mat with JJ.
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John Green

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Lmao..............I remember playing the 'NEW' juke box (1987) in the laundromat on base. It was the newest of it's kind because it offered video [cool]
As for drinking on base, I did it twice at the Enlisted Men's Club. One of those nights I ran into a high school friend, we had no idea either one of us were in the Navy. [smile]

I had a close friend who had his own apartment and we would drink there to stay away from trouble. Even when we were dry docked in Long Beach, I would ride on the back of his motorcycle down to San Dog every weekend. The weekends he had duty, I would hang out at Yankee Doodles, drink and shoot pool. I also remember passing out right in front of the carpenter shop door with my sea bag on my back. I woke up the next morning to find out someone stole my $200.00 pool stick out of my sea bag. That was a lot of money for a pool stick back then [mad]
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uva7@yahoo.com

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great stories john, and congrats on your 600th post..
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Charles R. Petrach

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Reply with quote  #9 
Em club in San diego was by pier 2 the PO club was on dry side.
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Rick Holly

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R. Petrach
Em club in San diego was by pier 2 the PO club was on dry side.

Did you go there often?
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Charles R. Petrach

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Reply with quote  #11 
Lunch every once and awhile. Did not drink there.
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OS2roycolon

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Well as I remember it ,,,, the EM club at NAVSTA San Diego was called " The Scuttlebutt" and as Charlie says it was at pier 2. If I knew how to post a picture I would show you a book of matches from the PO club that are in front of me as we speak. 12 DEC 2014. At Great Lakes the club was called "THE HELM" and was right across the street from the barracks we lived in, (630 complex) hospital side at GLAKES it was the "RATHSKELLER". For the purpose of time frame ,,,this info is from the 75-79 era.
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Rick Holly

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Reply with quote  #13 
Believe it or not, I never went inside! 
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uva7@yahoo.com

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i dont believe it rick, not even once?
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Rick Holly

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Quote:
Originally Posted by uva7@yahoo.com
i dont believe it rick, not even once?

I don't ever remember going in, not even once. I am not a big drinker and BSer.
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AZ1 Leo Shults, AIMD 1983

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Reply with quote  #16 
That sounds like BS...
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uva7@yahoo.com

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Reply with quote  #17 
i spent almost every night hammered in the e-club...    now im dry as a bone....
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Rick Holly

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Reply with quote  #18 
I did not have extra money for booze.
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uva7@yahoo.com

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Reply with quote  #19 
i diddnt have extra money after the booze,  they really made it easy to be a alcaholic....      mexico was close too, that diddnt help ...
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AZ1 Leo Shults, AIMD 1983

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Reply with quote  #20 
I agree, it was too easy to drink too much.

I started to smoke because I was drinking too much.  Instead of a beer, I'd have a smoke.  At .50 a pack vs .50 a drink, I was soon at 2 packs a day, but, I had money that went from paycheck to paycheck. 

It only took me 18 years to kick smoking.

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